June 12, 2017 – Using MongoDB with .NET

Joseph Fluckiger

Joseph Fluckiger

Abstract

What do MongoDB, Mars, Mythbusters, Michael Phelps, and Mass Spectrometers have in common? They are all a part of this informative talk about when and how to best use MongoDB from a .NET application.

We will answer these questions:

  • When is MongoDB the right fit for my application?
  • How does MongoDB performance compare with a relational databases?
  • What are the best MongoDB query patterns for my .NET Application?
  • I’ve heard that MongoDB is productive and easy by not reliable. How secure, reliable, compliant, scalable and performant is MongoDB?
  • I thought MongoDB was is for dynamic languages on a Linux stack. Does it work well on and Windows and with .NET?
  • I’ve heard that MongoDB clustering is hard to set up. Are there hosted service offerings that take care of this for me?

We’ll also talk about how ThermoFisher uses MongoDB to reduce scientific experiment times by an order of magnitude and some interesting applications that are making the world cleaner, safer and healthier.

Bio

Joseph is a Senior Software Architect at ThermoFisher Scientific leading efforts to build big-data Scientific workflows via the new ThermoFisher Cloud platform. Joseph has written software used to check for drugs in Michael Phelp’s pee, detect life on Mars, monitor signals from brain implants, broker trucking cargo transport, prioritize billion dollar private equity decisions, and even wrote software used by Mythbusters to check for rat urine on soda cans.

Joseph co-presented at AWS re:Invent 2016 with Mongo CTO Elliot Horowitz in 2016 and often presents at local developer and MongoDB user groups. He has a degree in Physics from Brigham Young University and a masters degree in Software Engineering from University of Texas at Austin. Joseph has been programming professionally for a couple of decades and for fun since his first Logo program on the Apple IIe. Joseph keeps busy in his free time mountain biking, teaching his 9 and 11 year old sons to program robots in Blockly, and singing along with his 4 year old daughter who has a Frozen obsession.

The talk will take place at Microsoft Austin office from 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on 6/12/2017.